Apps for students with special needs as school buildings shut

Apps for students with special needs are a boon during the tough times, especially during the worldwide pandemic situations where everything was just to a cease! Apps for students with special needs helped special kids in learning new things related to the world. Digital Apps for students with special needs allows them to become more independent and gain knowledge.

During the coronavirus epidemic, remote learning has become the new norm for K–12 education, posing significant obstacles for special education. On a good day, delivering differentiated content in a well-equipped classroom can be challenging, but now that most schools are closed or closing, educators who work with children with special needs must, in many respects, completely redesign their teaching strategy.

One of the most pressing concerns for both teachers and parents is keeping kids on pace to meet their individualized education program (IEP) goals and objectives, which are unique to each student. To promote this learning at home, teachers must now interact much more closely with parents/caregivers. In other circumstances, kids are used to having assistants in the classroom in addition to teachers. 

Remember that, as with any tool, what works for some children may frustrate others. With any software, customization is crucial, so adults and educators should expect to spend some time learning how to use the apps or making changes to the settings. Look for video tutorials, lesson plans, and extension activities in many apps that have been created by teachers.

Are there any free apps for students with special needs?

What is your opinion regarding this? Think about it and discover whether there are free apps for students with special needs. Of course, there are free apps for students with special needs. They are listed below: 

  • My PlayHome is a free app that provides children with a digital doll family of up to 15 members in various skin tones with whom they may interact, play, and exchange tales. These shared stories encourage students to speak up, provide a safe environment for social and emotional learning, and teach important early language skills.
  • SoundingBoard is a free mobile augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) app that helps children who cannot speak (or have limited speech) communicate. The software includes preloaded boards with symbols and recorded messages to fulfill the needs of this specific community. To generate a vocal message, students pick and press images on the board.
  • LetterSchool encourages youngsters to tap, touch, and trace colorful animations to improve their early literacy and numeracy skills. Letter formation, letter sounds and names, spelling, counting, and other preschool and primary abilities are all taught to children. This program, which comes with a free trial, is great for improving fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination.
  • Tales2Go, a free one-month trial audiobook service, assists pupils who struggle to read while also improving their listening abilities. This app contains a large library of stories and books for people of all ages, as well as a large number of excellent narrators who bring stories of many genres to life.
  • Epic! is a fantastic e-library for assisting reluctant or struggling readers. It offers more than 20,000 high-quality children’s books and educational videos, including a mix of fiction and nonfiction books from well-known publishers. During this time, Epic is providing free access to schools.

What about the paid apps for students with special needs? 

There are amazing paid apps that can help students with special needs as:

  • Edoki Academy’s Busy Shapes is based on Piaget’s research on cognitive development, and it starts with cause-and-effect play and progresses to a problem-solving and tool-use exercise. Through a series of puzzles in exploring and developing the playground, the game also helps toddlers strengthen their fine motor abilities. Edoki Academy also has a series of math applications that use a step-by-step technique to teach Montessori arithmetic to pupils by manipulating various objects on the screen. It also aids in the development of motor skills.
  • Math Drills is a skill-based math drills program that children enjoy since it allows them to compete against themselves to improve speed and accuracy. It covers basic math operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, as well as complex settings that allow teachers and students to customize environments and track scores and test history.
  • Phonics Genius teaches youngsters how to recognize, read, and speak words using letter sounds in a fun and engaging way. In addition to the engaging activities for practicing abilities, the app contains over 6,000 words organized by phonetic groups.
  • SentenceBuilder is a conversation simulator that teaches elementary-aged children how to have discussions with their peers in a variety of social circumstances, which can be especially difficult for special-needs pupils. 

For more Education related articles, you may also like; Using morning messages to start the day in Distance learning

  • Word Wizard comes with a talking alphabet that allows children to practice phonemic awareness and word formation. The voice reads any words the child makes, allowing for self-correction, which helps teach children in a non-threatening way. The program also has 184 built-in word lists, including the 1,000 most commonly used sight words, and helps with letter recognition, phonological awareness, and spelling. It even offers a comprehensive teacher activity guide and maintains track of children’s progress with precise monitoring.

Conclusion 

In this article, you learned that One of the most pressing concerns for both teachers and parents is keeping kids on pace to meet their individualized education program (IEP) goals and objectives, which are unique to each student. To promote this learning at home, teachers must now interact much more closely with parents/caregivers. In other circumstances, kids are used to having assistants in the classroom in addition to teachers. In this guide, apps for students with special needs are explained in a detailed format.  

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