Aiming for Discipline Instead of Punishment

Teaching is an art form in which a teacher can elicit something intelligent and novel from a dull and uneducated individual. A teacher’s task is to turn a person who is far from education and information into a gentleman. Teachers must have a calm and responsible mindset when it comes to their obligations. It’s difficult to instill discipline in an adolescent, a tiny child, or a student since it’s an age when the mind tells you not to listen to anyone and to just enjoy life. How is it expected to be easy to control little-age students who are enthusiastic but disciplining an adult mind is practically impossible? 

Traditional punishment with these pupils just intensifies power struggles and conflict cycles, causing an increase in the brain and body’s stress response. Punishment is used to try to get people to comply. The great majority of disciplinary processes in schools are kinds of punishment that work best with the pupils who need them the least.

As opposed to punishment, discipline is proactive and begins before issues arise. It entails viewing disagreement as a chance to address an issue. The discipline offers direction, emphasizes prevention, improves communication, demonstrates respect, and

accepts natural consequences. It instills values such as fairness, accountability, life skills, and problem-solving. When kids engage in hostile behavior, they must be removed from the classroom and school. 

So guys, let us know the difference between discipline and punishment and see which method is good for the improvement of children. 

What is the difference between discipline and punishment?

The difference between punishment and discipline may be a known thing for teachers but students are generally drawn towards punishment because of the ways they were raised. So, if you are aware of the difference between discipline and punishment, its well and good but if not, then look below to understand: 

Discipline lets children learn new skills and let them mend their behavior, solve issues, how to deal with unknown situations and many more. It encourages students to learn from their mistakes and how to deal with emotions like anger, frustration, disappointment, and so on. It fosters good bonds between teachers and children, which results in the children’s good behavior.  It helps you in good decision-making. 

On the other hand, punishment is a penalty for one’s offense. In layman’s language, it’s about letting a child pay for his mistakes. It is about controlling the child rather than letting him learn how to control himself. Do you know what the worst part of this is? It is that one can change their thinking about himself if punished more often. 

What are the brain-aligned preventive strategies? 

These are the strategies that can help you aim for discipline instead of punishment:

Procedures and routines are used to teach preventive systems. They are collaborative and offer a variety of options. Their goal is to achieve long-term behavioral change rather than merely short-term compliance or acquiescence. Simply identify and compile a list of our emotional triggers and coping mechanisms, and teach them how to quiet their stress response systems

using their breath and movement. 

Is there an adult at school that knows these students and has a place for them to go when they need to regroup and quiet their stress response systems? Are these methods being taught in advance of a moment when a student has to regulate away from the classroom?

Could your school provide a space where both teachers and students can go to reset their emotional states? Paper, markers, crayons, water, soothing music and lighting, a jump rope, a stationary bike, lavender-scented cotton balls, jars for affirmations or fears, or a rocking chair could all be found in this section. Students will need to be taught how to use this area ahead of time since they will only need it for two to five minutes to feel refocused and ready to return to class.

Few examples of natural and non-punitive consequences

Here are examples of natural and non-punitive consequences:

  • Ask the students to make a book that involves positive

thoughts for the class which they will teach to the younger children. This will inculcate a sense of good behavior in them. 

  • Discuss with the students as there are some inappropriate words

that they use at home, in this case, you have to understand the student’s situation and teach him.  

  • Give them the task so that they perform it wisely as you give

them a new learning spot in the room, they can serve the hurt person.

All these things will increase the sense of discipline amongst the children. 

Conclusion 

The whole context is all about discipline, teachers should focus on teaching discipline to students instead of punishing them for their mistakes. Discipline is proactive and begins before issues arise. It entails viewing disagreement as a chance to address an issue. The discipline offers direction, emphasizes prevention, improves communication, demonstrates respect, and accepts natural consequences. It instills values such as fairness, accountability, life skills, and problem-solving. When kids engage in hostile behavior, they must be removed from the classroom and school. Read it thoroughly for a better understanding. Stop punishing the child rather than teach them the values of discipline. 

Carter Martin
Latest posts by Carter Martin (see all)

Carter Martin

Hi, I am Carter, and Welcome to Answerout. I started writing on this Blog to share with you guys the tips, Facts and Research which I did in Education Field. & Unlike Some Students, I loved Learning Since a very young age and the best part which excites me are the new Findings in this Field and Increasing more Knowledge.

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