3 SEL Practices Teachers can use every day

SEL (social and emotional learning) is a crucial part of education and social development. SEL is the process by which all young individuals obtain and apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to develop healthy personalities, manage emotions, achieve personal and group goals, feel and feel compassion for others, maintain good trusting relationships, and make caring and responsible decisions.

These social and emotional learning practices don’t take long to implement, but they may have a significant influence on children in middle and high school.

What are your thoughts on the term “soft skills”? Critical thinking, empathy, creativity, and cooperation are not soft talents for me (or many others). These are referred to as “essential” or “core” talents. Learning and life revolve around decision-making, self-awareness, and self-regulation. We must begin with social and emotional learning (SEL), expand on it, and incorporate it into safe, equitable, and empowering learning experiences for all kids.

We know that the purposeful and explicit weaving of SEL into the fabric of our everyday learning and living is vital, regardless of your teaching and learning scenario (totally online, hybrid, or in-person). The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) has three SEL trademark practices that we need to incorporate whenever we come together as a community of learners. Simple, portable, and adaptable examples are shown. When determining whether to take turns sharing out loud, use the chat, or divide into small groups or pairs, think about your situation as well as the requirements and size of your group.

3 SEL Practices For Each Day

1. Activities to welcome or include others.

Starting with brief routines and rituals, rather than diving immediately into instruction, gives us participatory experiences that give everyone a voice and link the community of learners.

Here are a few examples:

  • Allow pupils to identify their feelings by using opening check-ins (self-awareness). We may use tools like Zones of Regulation or the Mood Meter to create scaffolding. To aid increase vocabulary, we may also employ visuals and word banks.
  • Invite everyone to participate in a kindness conversation by sharing a recent act of generosity they have given or received (social awareness).
  • Permission slips, created by Brené Brown, let us set our aim and concentration. “I give myself the approval to make an error and try again,” for example. After that, have pupils make their permission slips (self-management).

2. Engaging Strategies.

SEL possibilities abound across learning activities, where students are naturally engaged independently and with their peers. We employ engaging tactics like breakout rooms/small group talks, wait time, brain breaks, jigsaw, and so on as instructors. With SEL, though, we must be clear.

Here are a few examples:

  • Shared expectations for collaborative work should be created ahead of time and revisited regularly to ensure that everyone’s demands are satisfied (relationship skills, responsible decision-making, social awareness).
  • Allow learners to generate meaning via dialogue and cooperation with their peers by designing for inquiry with voice and choice. Learners can examine information before receiving direct teaching by using a Discover, Discuss, Demonstrate strategy (relationship skills, responsible decision making, self-management).
  • To renew and reset the brain, use exercise breaks. Stretching or practicing mindful breathing can be used as brain breaks. The pause might be used to soothe or invigorate, depending on the circumstances (self-management).

We need to provide both participatory and introspective alternatives since we aim to employ engaging tactics, activities, and procedures. Making time to debrief these experiences is also crucial, as it allows us to discover and relate what we’re doing to SEL characteristics and particular abilities. It’s worth noting how much of this corresponds to Universal Design for Learning (UDL).

3. A positive conclusion.

The name of this exercise frequently leads to the erroneous belief that we must conclude on a cheerful note. The truth is that the most significant aspect of this activity is the deliberate and genuine reflection and interpretation of the learning experience. This helps us to appreciate what we’ve done as a group and individually, as well as look forward to what’s coming.

Some examples are:

  • By simply asking, “Which one to two words sum up your sentiments regarding our time together?” we may reflect on conducting a final check-in on emotions. (self-awareness).
  • A thankfulness practice is another approach to reflect (social awareness). Ask students to name something or someone for whom they are grateful. Encourage them to reflect carefully and to name the emotions they are feeling (self-awareness).
  • Looking forward is intended to get us enthusiastic about the future while simultaneously providing a chance to hold ourselves responsible via goal-setting and organizing. To perform the following actions, use a scheduler and/or set a reminder. You may even utilize a program like FutureMe.org to convey long-term objectives to your future self (self-management).

These are only a few examples of how to put the three hallmark practices into action; more examples may be found here. The truth is that there are several applications for these techniques. Engage with your students and peers to modify and build practices that match your community’s particular objectives and requirements. Your team may also utilize Micaela Gerardin-“Getting Frey’s It Down PATT!”—Purpose, Alignment, Transparency, Target—as a tool to carefully choose, modify, and prepare strategies, actions, and protocols.

Emotions are important, and studies on how emotions affect learning are abundant. But admitting SEL’s importance as a way of improving academic success isn’t enough. We can promote safe, fair, and powerful learning opportunities for all, children and adults, by incorporating the three core principles into a comprehensive SEL approach.

About the article

SEL (social and emotional learning) is a crucial part of education and social development. SEL is the process by which all young individuals obtain and apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to develop healthy personalities, manage emotions, achieve personal and group goals, feel and feel compassion for others, maintain good trusting relationships, and make caring and responsible decisions. In this article, we discussed 3 SEL practices that teachers can use every day.

Carter Martin
Latest posts by Carter Martin (see all)

Carter Martin

Hi, I am Carter, and Welcome to Answerout. I started writing on this Blog to share with you guys the tips, Facts and Research which I did in Education Field. & Unlike Some Students, I loved Learning Since a very young age and the best part which excites me are the new Findings in this Field and Increasing more Knowledge.

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